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15 new books coming out today.

Katie Yee

October 26, 2021, 4:48am

They’re saying October is the new December when it comes to holiday shopping! I’m sure you’ve heard about all the looming supply chain issues by now, and the best way to beat the rush is by getting your goodies early. This Tuesday, a beautiful bounty of books awaits. Perhaps you’ll find something for your loved ones on this list/at your local indies!

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woolgathering_patti smith

Patti Smith, Woolgathering
(New Directions
)

“A slim, poetic memoir of Smith’s early years … Ethereal spins of innocence and enchantment.”
–Kirkus

Requeening_Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore, Requeening: Poems
(Ecco)

“These highly descriptive poems evoke a dreamlike state, one that is quick-moving and evocative, temporarily erasing actual and imagined boundaries.”
–Library Journal

Louise Glück, Winter Recipes from the Collective

Louise Glück, Winter Recipes from the Collective: Poems
(FSG)

“With this magnificent collection, a great poet delivers a treatise on how to live and die.”
–Publishers Weekly

Paul Auster, Burning Boy: The Life and Work of Stephen Crane

Paul Auster, Burning Boy
(Henry Holt)

“Auster plainly loves Crane—and wants the reader to—for Crane’s own far-from-sweet sake. And Auster is right: Crane counts … Auster is often sharp-eyed and revealing about the details of Crane’s writing.”
–The New Yorker

alan cumming_baggage

Alan Cumming, Baggage
(Dey Street)

“Cathartic and revelatory, Cumming’s memoir will fascinate fans and those who relate to his internal struggle.”
–Kirkus

katie couric_going there

Katie Couric, Going There
(Little, Brown)

“Couric attempts to fill in those messy parts, to demystify herself and the world she inhabits. What readers learn is that behind that chipper veneer there was a sharper-edged, savvier figure quietly taking notes—and judging everyone.”
–The Washington Post

Farah Ali_People Want to Live

Farah Ali, People Want to Live
(McSweeney’s)

“Ali’s debut collection delivers sharp insights into Pakistani culture and lifestyle … Ali’s dexterous debut strikes hard.”
–Publishers Weekly

from warsaw with love

John Pomfret, From Warsaw with Love
(Henry Holt)

“An eye-opening account of America’s relations with Poland and its intelligence service … A lively and insightful exploration of an overlooked international alliance.”
–Kirkus

THE ELECTRICITY OF EVERY LIVING THING A WOMAN’S WALK IN THE WILD TO FIND HER WAY HOME KATHERINE MAY

Katherine May, The Electricity of Every Living Thing
(Melville)

“In this powerfully descriptive work, a grueling hike becomes a metaphor for a woman’s experience with Asperger’s syndrome … Candid, rough, and uplifting, this moving account shines.”
–Publishers Weekly

kevin boyle_the shattering

Kevin Boyle, The Shattering
(W.W. Norton)

“[A] skillful encapsulation of an era that brought to a boil conflicts still tormenting American society today.”
–Publishers Weekly

cairo circles_doma mahmoud

Doma Mahmoud, Cairo Circles
(Unnamed Press)

“This novel’s complex web of relationships makes for an ambitious literary debut.”
–Kirkus

Kwon Yeo-Sun_Lemon

Kwon Yeo-Sun, tr. Janet Hong, Lemon
(Other Press)

“Those ready to sink into a creepy and intense yet understated emotional experience will find that this story hits and sticks.”
–Publishers Weekly

The Approaching Storm

Neil Lanctot, The Approaching Storm
(Riverhead)

“…meticulously researched … A rigorous, dense historical study that reveals how three individuals helped pave the way for the American century.”
–Kirkus

Mr. Beethoven_Paul Griffiths

Paul Griffiths, Mr. Beethoven
(NYRB)

“Stylistically rich and thoughtfully conceived historical fiction.”
–Kirkus

Pamela Paul, 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet

Pamela Paul, 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet
(Crown)

“Readers who remember the dawning of the internet era will find plenty to commiserate with in this mostly lighthearted lament.”
–Publishers Weekly

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