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    21 new books to add to your TBR pile this week.

    Katie Yee

    August 17, 2021, 8:58am

    It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s this week’s biggest new books—coming to indie bookstores near you!

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    Billie Jean King, ALL IN: An Autobiography

    Billie Jean King, All In
    (Knopf)

    “[A] lively and inspiring portrait of pressure-cooker play and political upheaval in tennis, from one of its most fascinating figures.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    The Reckoning_Mary L Trump

    Mary L. Trump, The Reckoning
    (St. Martin’s Press)

    “The book is a mixture of family lore, history, policy and anger. As expected, Mary Trump’s disdain for her uncle is once again made clear.”
    –The Guardian

    The Ones Who Don't Say They Love You

    Maurice Carlos Ruffin, The Ones Who Don’t Say I Love You
    (One World)

    “Ruffin writes with the clipped motion of the best comic books, and the unsparing tenderness of a poet. Readers enamored with the relentless lyricism of his novel may be surprised to find a gentler voice guiding these stories, without judgment. This softness is exactly what binds these patchwork chronicles into a vibrant and true mosaic of a place.”
    –The New York Times Book Review

    Jaime Cortez, Gordo

    Jaime Cortez, Gordo
    (Grove Press)

    “Cortez is a deeply compassionate writer; he obviously cares about his characters, though he doesn’t treat them with kid gloves.”
    –NPR

    yoon choi skinship

    Yoon Choi, Skinship
    (Knopf)

    “Each voice has something meaningful to say in this accomplished collection.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    Frances Wilson, Burning Man: The Trials of D. H. Lawrence

    Frances Wilson, Burning Man
    (FSG)

    “…this is a book that performs a rare and laudable task: of saving a writer, posthumously, from himself. We are all beneficiaries of Wilson’s articulate and persuasive advocacy.”
    –Literary Review

    George R. Stewart, Storm

    George R. Stewart, Storm
    (NYRB)

    “The storm itself … becomes absorbing as few human characters, in fiction, ever are. It is a splendid job of research and design.”
    –TIME

    what about the baby

    Alice McDermott, What About the Baby
    (FSG)

    “With style and wit, novelist McDermott (The Ninth Hour) offers a master class on writing fiction.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    James Whiteside_Center Center

    James Whiteside, Center Center
    (Viking)

    “Through essays that jeté gracefully back and forth through time, Whiteside lays bare his Connecticut youth spent in a splintered family, his turbulent path toward coming out as a young gay ballet dancer in the 2000s, and a litany of misadventures in New York City with his feted drag coterie, the Dairy Queens.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    Eloquence of the Sardine, Bill Francois

    Bill François, tr. Antony Shugaar, Eloquence of the Sardine
    (St. Martin’s Press)

    “Marine scientist François surveys underwater creatures of all sorts in his illuminating debut collection of 15 essays that lay bare his fascination with deep waters that teem with crab, shrimp, and ‘scarlet sea anemones [he] didn’t dare touch.'”
    –Publishers Weekly

    a brief history of motion

    Tom Standage, A Brief History of Motion
    (Bloomsbury)

    “Standage nimbly touches all the bases in this sprightly historical race.”
    –Kirkus

    Nichole Perkins, Sometimes I Trip on How Happy We Could Be

    Nichole Perkins, Sometimes I Trip on How Happy We Could Be
    (Grand Central)

    “Fans will appreciate this closer look into Perkins’ life and adventures, and newcomers will get to know her well.”
    –Kirkus

    Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar, Still Mad

    Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar, Still Mad
    (W. W. Norton)

    “[A] well-informed and accessible survey of the literature of modern feminism.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    I Live a Life Like Yours

    Jan Grue, tr. B. L. Crook, I Live a Life Like Yours
    (FSG Originals)

    “A sensitive examination of the meaning of disability … Absorbing, insightful reflections on being human.”
    –Kirkus

    Gold, Oil, and Avocados

    Andy Robinson, Gold, Oil, and Avocados
    (Melville)

    “It’s a sobering and well-documented picture, shot through with Robinson’s caustic wit … This sweeping survey packs a punch.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    Lizzie Johnson, Paradise: One Town's Struggle to Survive an American Wildfire

    Lizzie Johnson, Paradise
    (Crown)

    “A reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle gives a masterly account of the 2018 Camp Fire, which devastated the town of Paradise, California.”
    –Kirkus

    Rafia Zakaria, Against White Feminism

    Rafia Zakaria, Against White Feminism
    (W. W. Norton)

    “Zakaria lays out the damage white feminism has wrought in clear, unflinching terms and urges readers to commit to a feminism that is truly collective and global.”
    –Booklist

    names for light

    Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint, Names for Light
    (Graywolf)

    “…undeniably powerful … An imaginative and compelling memoir about what we inherit and what we pass on.”
    Kirkus

    John Lurie, The History of Bones
    (Random House)

    “His raucously frank, sardonic, sex-saturated, compulsively detailed, and hard-charging memoir is incandescent with illuminations of his musical mission, including his film scores, his friendship with Jean-Michel Basquiat, and his conflicts with Jim Jarmusch.”
    –Booklist

    Two Way Mirror, Fiona Sampson

    Fiona Sampson, Two-Way Mirror
    (W. W. Norton)

    “Fiona Sampson’s passionate and exacting biography of Elizabeth Barrett Browning is a surprisingly compact volume, a bristling lyrical sandwich of philosophy and action. It is also a page-turner.”
    –The Irish Times

    Eyal Press, Dirty Work

    Eyal Press, Dirty Work
    (FSG)

    “Probing … A provocative book that will make readers more aware of terrible things done in their names.”
    –Kirkus

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