The Hub

News, Notes, Talk

20 new books to fuel your summer reading.

Katie Yee

July 7, 2020, 9:48am

Summer reading had me a blast
Summer reading happened so fast
I found a book perfect for me
Bought a book new as can be…

Seriously, friends, what else is there to do on these hot summer days besides belt out the lyrics to songs from Grease and enjoy these brand-new books?

*

Charlie Kaufman, Antkind
(Random House)

“Kaufman’s debut brims with screwball satire and provocative reflections on how art shapes people’s perception of the world.”
–Publishers Weekly

 

Lynn Steger Strong, Want

Lynn Steger Strong, Want
(Henry Holt)

“It’s an odd pleasure — a difficult story that is winningly told. You’ll feel guilty for enjoying it as much as you do.”
–Vulture

 

Robin Wasserman, Mother Daughter Widow Wife

Robin Wasserman, Mother Daughter Widow Wife
(Scribner)

“An enthralling, gritty, and altogether unpredictable read that holds nothing back … You will be utterly riveted.”
–Buzzfeed

 

Sameer Pandya, Members Only
(Houghton Mifflin)

“Pandya’s writing here is smooth, clear, funny, and often subtly beautiful. Members Only is the thoughtful page-turner we need right now.”
–Booklist

 

Lysley Tenorio, The Son of Good Fortune
(Ecco)

“A masterfully constructed story of identity and ambition and an authentic portrait of one unforgettable Filipino family.”
–Kirkus

 

Joe Sacco, Paying the Land
(Metropolitan Books)

“…masterful … a startling depiction of an Indigenous people struggling to remain true to their traditions. Yet another triumph for Sacco.”
–Kirkus

 

Andrew Martin, Cool for America

Andrew Martin, Cool for America
(FSG)

“Frequently hilarious, Martin’s stories are insightful, and the characters are both truthful and authentic.”
–Kirkus

 

Virginie Despentes, tr. Frank Wynne, Vernon Subutex 2
(FSG Originals)

“[A] sexed-up epic, an achievement greater than the sum of its wildly colorful parts.”
–Publishers Weekly

 

Sarah Gerard, True Love

Sarah Gerard, True Love
(Harper)

“Nina’s search for love, fulfillment, and demonstrative success becomes a scathing critique of modern hustle culture and the privilege of making art.”
–Booklist

 

Blake Butler, Alice Knott
(Riverhead)

“An endlessly surprising, funny, and subversive writer.”
–Publishers Weekly

 

Lee Connell, The Party Upstairs

Lee Conell, The Party Upstairs
(Penguin Press)

“A slow-burning debut that keenly dissects privilege, power, and the devastation of unfulfilled expectations.”
–Kirkus

 

Ben Ehrenreich, Desert Notebooks

Ben Ehrenreich, Desert Notebooks
(Counterpoint)

“Ehrenreich creates a beautiful meditation on adapting to future cataclysm.”
–Publishers Weekly

 

Daphne Merkin, 22 Minutes of Unconditional Love
(FSG)

“Merkin’s incisive novel of a woman piloting herself through the wildfire of sexual obsession is as boldly canny as it is cleverly diverting.”
–Booklist

 

Lacy Crawford, Notes on a Silencing

Lacy Crawford, Notes on a Silencing
(Little, Brown and Company)

“Trenchant in its observations about the unspoken—and often criminal—double standards that adhere in elite spaces, Crawford’s courageous book is a bracing reminder of the dangers inherent in unchecked patriarchal power.”
–Kirkus

 

Anonymous, Becoming Duchess Goldblatt
(Houghton Mifflin)

“In Becoming Duchess Goldblatt, the Duchess’ real-life anonymous creator writes about crafting one of Twitter’s (if not the Internet’s) best accounts and healing herself in the process.”
–RealSimple

 

Sophie Heawood, The Hungover Games
(Little, Brown and Company)

“Raw and funny, Heawood’s memoir celebrates the messiness of life and motherhood with boldness, panache, and unexpected moments of real poignancy.”
–Booklist

 

DW Gibson, 14 Miles
(Simon & Schuster)

“An important current affairs book that deserves a wide audience before the 2020 election.”
–Kirkus

 

Jim Carrey, Memoirs and Misinformation
(Knopf)

“…this is an engaging, fun tale that plays with the public perceptions of celebrities, questions our compulsive need to view, and contains a gloriously off-the-wall conclusion.”
–Booklist

 

Mark Bowden, The Case of the Vanishing Blonde
(Atlantic Monthly)

“Bowden writes with journalistic efficiency and a matter-of-fact admiration of the investigative work.”
–Booklist

 

Paul Tremblay, Survivor Song
(William Morrow)

“A cinematic scope, scenarios grounded in the real world, and a breathless pace make this thriller one of the must-read titles of the summer.”
–Kirkus

 

 

%d bloggers like this: