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20 brand-new books hitting shelves today.

Katie Yee

April 21, 2020, 9:42am

The days in quarantine would all blend together if it weren’t for TUESDAY, which is the day new books hit the (now metaphorical) shelves. Here are a few of the titles dropping today. Get stoked, get them from your local indie and/or Bookshop, and get to reading!

*

Yukio Mishima, Life for Sale
(Vintage)

“An eccentric satire. . . . [An] offbeat, sardonic yarn about self-commodification and its discontents.”
–Kirkus

Souvankham Thammavongsa, How To Pronounce Knife
(Little, Brown)

“The stories here will gut you, as Thammavongsa’s insight proves to be razor-sharp.”
–Bustle

Joseph Mazur, The Clock Mirage

Joseph Mazur,  The Clock Mirage 
(Yale University Press)

“A thought-provoking voyage.”
–Publishers Weekly

Jeni McFarland, The House of Deep Water 
(Putnam)

“A nuanced, realistic portrait of small-town America, brimming with secrets and scandal.”
–Salon

Frances Cha, If I Had Your Face
(Ballantine)

“Cha navigates the obstacles of her characters’ lives with ease and heartbreaking realism.”
–Publishers Weekly

Janelle Brown, Pretty Things
(Random House)

“Brown offers a glittering, high-stakes drama, stacking childhood nostalgia against the power to reinvent oneself in the age of social media.”
–Booklist

Jennifer Finney Boylan, Good Boy 
(Celadon Books)

“Reading Boylan’s memoirs is like working on a three-dimensional puzzle that mysteriously creates space for more pieces.”
–The Rumpus

sigh gone

Phuc Tran, Sigh, Gone: A Misfit’s Memoir 
(Flatiron)

“A compelling story of an outsider discovering himself and a world where he fit in.”
–Booklist

Michael Kimmage, The Abandonment of the West 
(Basic Books)

“This is an exceedingly important book and certainly one that would benefit all American readers.”
–Library Journal

Michael Rips, The Golden Flea
(W.W. Norton)

“…a tender, passionate, melancholy elegy to an ancient project of reclamation.”
–Bookforum

Ian Williams, Reproduction
(Europa Editions)

“Polyphonic and big-hearted.”
–Electric Literature

Sara Paretsky, Dead Land

Sara Paretsky, Dead Land
(William Morrow)

“[A] series bar-raiser . . . A high point in Paretsky’s long-running and much-loved series.”
–Booklist

Madeleine L’Engle, The Moment of Tenderness 
(Grand Central)

“A luminous collection that mines the mundane as cannily as the fantastic and extraterrestrial.”
–Kirkus

Tom Clavin, Tombstone 
(St. Martin’s)

“Clavin shows that there is more to the story of Tombstone than the Earps and the well-known gunfight.”
–Library Journal

Stephen King, If It Bleeds 
(Scribner)

“The straightforward cadences of King’s voice, paired with his signature sit-down-and-let-me-tell-you-a-story style, were immediately soothing.”
–The New York Times Book Review

Sebastian Barry, A Thousand Moons
(Viking)

“…our clear-eyed guide not only to the annihilated past but also to the enduring natural world.”
–The Wall Street Journal


Szczepan Twardoch, The King of Warsaw
(Amazon Crossing)

“A wickedly enthralling novel by one of Poland’s emerging literary stars.”
–Kirkus

Thomas Rid, Active Measures
(FSG)

“There are plenty of clever, clandestine capers in Rid’s well-researched, briskly paced narrative.”
–Publishers Weekly

Jason Rosenthal, My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me 
(Harper)

“Rosenthal’s gut-wrenching, honest, and uplifting memoir offers reassurance and connection.”
–Booklist

Rishi Reddi, Passage West
(Ecco)

“Reddi’s richly imagined, character-driven novel sheds light on a little-known history of Indians in the U.S.”
–Booklist

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