The Hub

News, Notes, Talk

19 new books to find at your local bookstore.

Katie Yee

December 7, 2021, 5:06am

Consider this your weekly reminder to drop in at your local indie. Maybe think of this list as your scavenger hunt. How many can you find? How many will you get?!

*

Tabitha Lasley, Sea State: A Memoir

Tabitha Lasley, Sea State
(Ecco)

“What sets Lasley apart as a genuinely exceptional writer is her ability to first spot, and then effectively relay, the small yet defining details of a person, scene or experience.”
–The Irish Times

Siri Hustvedt, Mothers, Fathers, and Others: Essays

Siri Hustvedt, Mothers, Fathers, and Others
(Simon & Schuster)

“Another outstanding compilation of essays from Hustvedt … Brilliant and utterly transfixing.”
–Kirkus

Juhea Kim, Beasts of a Little Land

Juhea Kim, Beasts of a Little Land
(Ecco)

“Kim’s debut novel wondrously reveals broken families and surprising alliances created by uncontrollable circumstances.”
–Booklist

Accidental Gods

Anna Della Subin, Accidental Gods
(Metropolitan Books)

Accidental Gods is one of those carefully researched books of nonfiction guaranteed to make you feel smarter by the end … Underneath its fascinating parade of ideas and historical snippets, the structure and sequencing are truly elegant.”
–Bookforum

Bright Burning Things

Lisa Harding, Bright Burning Things
(Harpervia)

“Intense and unnerving … There’s a lot to lament, and even more to rail against, in a novel that becomes a ferocious jeremiad against life’s suffocating forces.”
–The Guardian

sasa stanisic_where you come from

Damion Searls, tr. Sasa Stanisic, Where You Come From
(Tin House)

“The novel is determined to surprise and unmoor readers, perhaps in the same way the author/protagonist found the course of his own life surprising and disconcerting, with the author’s restless imagination a constant, delightful companion.”
–Shelf Awareness

Robert Gottlieb, Garbo: Her Life, Her Films

Robert Gottlieb, Garbo
(FSG)

“Gottlieb’s research is so complete and his style so engaging that this book almost reads like an oral biography told through a singular voice.”
–Library Journal

Jim Harrison Completed poems

Jim Harrison, Jim Harrison: Complete Poems
(Copper Canyon Press)

“This immense volume will bring great pleasure to readers of James Wright and John Haines and may be the perfect lure for ardent readers of Harrison’s fiction; they will find many poems to cherish.”
–Library Journal

sharon gless_apparently there were complaints

Sharon Gless, Apparently There Were Complaints
(Simon & Schuster)

“Emmy Award–winning actor Gless debuts with a no-holds-barred look at her long and storied career.”
–Publishers Weekly

Francesco Pacifico, tr. Elizabeth Harris, The Women I Love

Francesco Pacifico, tr. Eizabeth Harris, The Women I Love
(FSG)

“The protagonist’s ambivalent, messy emotions propel this amusing foray. It adds up to a darkly funny exploration of entanglements and terminal self-regard.”
–Publishers Weekly

the cat who saved books

Sosuke Natsuwaka, tr. Louise Heal Kawai, The Cat Who Saved Books
(Harpervia)

“Cats, books, young love, and adventure: catnip for a variety of readers!”
–Kirkus

Matthew Gabriele and David M. Perry, The Bright Ages
(Harper)

“…an appealing account of a millennium packed with culture, beauty, science, learning, and the rise and fall of empires.”
–Kirkus

out of office

Charlie Warzel and Anne Helen Petersen, Out of Office
(Knopf)

“Never sacrificing meaningful analysis for easy answers, this is a remarkable examination of the rapidly-changing workplace.”
–Publishers Weekly

Joe Moshenska, Making Darkness Light: A Life of John Milton

Joe Moshenska, Making Darkness Light
(Basic Books)

“The author draws his reader, not only into the life and world of his subject, but into a sort of lived experience of Milton’s approach to poetry.”
–The Boston Globe

Obed Silva, The Death of My Father the Pope
(MCD)

“The power of The Death of My Father the Pope lies in Silva’s willingness to address even this; he never looks away. His book is an unrequited love story, told in fragments, through the lens of death.”
–Los Angeles Times

Tell Me How to Be

Neel Patel, Tell Me How to Be
(Flatiron)

“Patel skillfully maneuvers through the treacherous territory of abandoned dreams, family squabbles, and cultural clashes before finding a resounding catharsis for mother and son. The result is noteworthy and memorable.”
–Publishers Weekly

white on white

Aysegül Savas, White on White
(Riverhead)

“Propelled by a rich voice and sharp eye, and ultimately offering an insightful study of the decay wrought by time on relationships and identity, White on White stands as both a well-defined and well-executed work in its own right and a prime example of the evolutionary process of the novel as an art form.”
–The Chicago Review of Books

Gary Goodman_the Last Bookseller

Gary Goodman, The Last Bookseller
(University of Minnesota Press)

“He tells his tale like a man who has seen a thing or two and lived to tell about it, a story best unwound over a beer in the corner of a dive bar.”
–Star Tribune

call us what we carry_amanda gorman

Amanda Gorman, Call Us What We Carry
(Viking)

“By affirming this link between memory and water, between body and country, Gorman points to the importance of remembering what came before us … Ultimately, Call Us What We Carry points to this inherent hope.”
–NPR

%d bloggers like this: