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15 new books to hunker down with.

Katie Yee

February 16, 2021, 12:58pm

Is there anything better than the days after Valentine’s Day, when perfectly delicious chocolate is discounted? I know I’m not alone in stocking up! But, hey, since you’re out anyway, you may as well stop by your local indie and pick up one of these bad boys. They make good company.

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Patricia Lockwood, No One Is Talking About This

Patricia Lockwood, No One Is Talking about This
(Riverhead)

“With unfettered, imagistic language, Lockwood conjures both a digital life that’s easily fallen into, and the sorts of love and grief that can make it all fall away.”
–Booklist

Bill Gates, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster

Bill Gates, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster
(Knopf)

“Gates makes a significant contribution to the rapidly growing shelf of books that not only acknowledge climate change, but also propose viable solutions.”
–Kirkus

Roberto Bolaño, tr. Natasha Wimmer, Cowboy Graves

Roberto Bolaño, tr. Natasha Wimmer, Cowboy Graves
(Penguin Press)

“Like virtually everything the incomparable Chilean wrote, a newly excavated trio of unarguably minor novellas, Cowboy Graves, is companionable, exotic, witty and glamorously suggestive.”
–The Guardian

María José Ferrada, tr. Elizabeth Bryer, How to Order the Universe

María José Ferrada, tr. Elizabeth Bryer, How to Order the Universe
(Tin House)

“M’s systematic attempts to make meaning out of her chaotic life may be futile, but they offer a canny insight into her magical mind … Ferrada — a prizewinning Chilean children’s book author — cleverly pulls the curtain back at just the right moments.”
–The New York Times

Betina González, tr. Heather Cleary, American Delirium
(Henry Holt)

“González, who lives in Argentina, uses absurdity to show us that there is the thinnest of lines between utopia and dystopia, all without ever naming any real-world correlates.”
–Kirkus

Henry Louis Gates Jr., The Black Church

Henry Louis Gates Jr., The Black Church
(Penguin Press)

“A a brisk and insightful look at how the Black church has succored generations of African Americans against white supremacy … Gates details how the Black church carved out support networks and the political tools to fight for full citizenship for Black Americans.”
–Publishers Weekly

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, The Daughters of Kobani

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, The Daughters of Kobani
(Penguin Press)

“Handling difficult topics with adroit respect and care, Lemmon offers a story that’s eminently relatable and speaks to the ongoing fight for women’s rights the world over.”
–Library Journal

Vanessa Springora, tr. Natasha Lehrer, Consent,

Vanessa Springora, tr. Natasha Lehrer, Consent
(Harpervia)

“Springora’s style is incisive and she keeps readers hooked with short chapters depicting a post-1968 libertarian establishment that lets her down.”
–The Financial Times

Sarah Gailey, The Echo Wife

Sarah Gailey, The Echo Wife
(Tor Books)

“Gailey has done it again, creating an utterly unique sci-fi thriller. Equal parts unsettling and unputdownable, readers will cringe as they tear through this eerie tale, unable to look away from the ethical monstrosity.”
–The Nerd Daily

True Believer_Abraham Riesman

Abraham Riesman, True Believer
(Crown)

True Believer is part for-the-record biography and part an effort to balance the scales between Lee’s public reputation and the more complicated truth underneath.”
–Forbes

the sum of us_heather mcghee

Heather McGhee, The Sum of Us
(One World)

“Political commentator McGhee argues in her astute and persuasive debut that income inequality and the decline of the middle and working classes in America are a direct result of the country’s long history of racial injustice.”
–Publishers Weekly

We Had a Little Real Estate Problem_Kliph Nesteroff

Kliph Nesteroff, We Had a Little Real Estate Problem
(Simon & Schuster)

“Richly researched and told through the vibrant voices of the comics themselves…Kliph Nesteroff’s extraordinary We Had a Little Real Estate Problem chronicles a legacy deserving of inclusion in the history of comedy in the U.S.”
–BookPage

Blindfold Theo Padnos

Theo Padnos, Blindfold
(Scribner)

“With emotional clarity, Padnos endows his captors with humanity, casting them as people struggling to survive in a world turned upside down, just as he is.”
–BookPage

Let's Get Back to the Party

Zak Salih, Let’s Get Back to the Party
(Algonquin)

“An insightful examination of two of the many ways gay men present themselves in contemporary America.”
–Kirkus

want me

Tracy Clark-Flory, Want Me
(Penguin)

“A provocative, resonant memoir of emboldened self-discovery.”
–Kirkus

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