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15 new books to get jazzed about this week.

Katie Yee

October 4, 2022, 8:25am

There’s a lot to look forward to in this week’s book bounty: new titles from Celeste Ng, Elizabeth McCracken, Orhan Pamuk, and more. Happy reading!

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our missing hearts

Celeste Ng, Our Missing Hearts
(Penguin Press)

“With a chilling premise and frequently stunning prose, this dystopian drama is a jolt to the system and a booster of hope.”
–Oprah Daily

Elizabeth McCracken, The Hero of This Book

Elizabeth McCracken, The Hero of This Book
(Ecco)

“Transcending categories, McCracken’s novel-as-eulogy and meditation on writing and truth is mischievous, funny, canny, and deeply affecting.”
–Booklist

Orhan Pamuk, Nights of Plague

Orhan Pamuk, tr. Ekin Oklap, Nights of Plague
(Knopf)

“…fascinating, wearying, and, dare I say, oddly timeless book, although Pamuk clearly has an eye on the present … a complex and intriguing amalgam of form and genre.”
–Air Mail

Sharon Olds, Balladz

Sharon Olds, Balladz
(Knopf)

“Passionately precise, Olds unites the primordial with the scientific, the mundane with the chthonic, flesh with spirit.”
–Booklist

Christopher M. Hood, The Revivalists

Christopher M. Hood, The Revivalists
(Harper)

“Perfect for fans of post-apocalyptic fiction and reminiscent of Station Eleven, Hood’s debut samples the full spectrum of human nature and is gripping from beginning to end.”
–Kirkus

Ryan Lee Wong, Which Side Are You On

Ryan Lee Wong, Which Side Are You On
(Catapult)

“A profound and nuanced bildungsroman … This daring and generous work is sure to spark difficult but necessary conversations.”
–Publishers Weekly

it came from the closet

Joe Vallese (ed.), It Came from the Closet
(Feminist Press)

“A brilliant display of expert criticism, wry humor, and original thinking. This is full of surprises.”
–Publishers Weekly

Maggie Haberman, Confidence Man: The Making of Donald Trump and the Breaking of America

Maggie Haberman, Confidence Man
(Penguin Press)

“Haberman’s contribution in Confidence Man, though, is much larger than its arresting anecdotes. Later generations of historians will puzzle over Trump’s rise to national power. The best of them will have learned from Haberman’s book.”
–The Washington Post

making a scene_constanec wu

Constance Wu, Making a Scene
(Scribner)

“Wu, star of Crazy Rich Asians, dazzles in this essay collection about love, family, and her hard-won path to Hollywood success.”
–Publishers Weekly

MAD HONEY

Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan, Mad Honey
(Ballantine)

“This timely and absorbing read will make readers glad these two powerful writers decided to collaborate.”
–Booklist

the strange inheritance of leah fern

Rita Zoey Chin, The Strange Inheritance of Leah Fern
(Melville House)

“There is much to admire about the author’s glittering imagination…traveling with Leah Fern and seeing the world through the eyes of an empath are enjoyable.”
–Kirkus

life is everywhere

Lucy Ives, Life Is Everywhere
(Graywolf Press)

Life Is Everywhere formally literalizes Le Guin’s carrier bag: texts cite further referents, self-divide, replicate, and undercut one another. The narrative recursively dehisces itself … What fascinates about Ives’s maneuvering is these interstices and echoic functions are where the psychic and narrative excesses of trauma—its ‘untellable too muchness—are reckoned with.”
–Bookforum

a minor chorus

Billy-Ray Belcourt, A Minor Chorus
(W. W. Norton)

“Memoirist Belcourt (A History of My Brief Body) delivers an achingly gorgeous debut novel of Indigenous survival.”
–Publishers Weekly

night ship

Jess Kidd, The Night Ship
(Atria)

“An ambitious, melancholy work of historical fiction that offers two wondrous young protagonists for the price of one.”
–Kirkus

Diana Preston, The Evolution of Charles Darwin
(Atlantic Monthly)

“A brisk and accessible account of how Charles Darwin developed his theory of natural selection … A rewarding look at the development of an earth-shattering idea.”
–Publishers Weekly

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