• The Hub

    News, Notes, Talk

    13 new books to cling to this week.

    Katie Yee

    October 18, 2022, 4:48am

    I don’t know about you, but I’m hanging by a thin thread this week, and that thread is the promise of new books by George Saunders, Samanta Schweblin, Fatimah Asghar, and more.

    *

    George Saunders, Liberation Day

    George Saunders, Liberation Day
    (Random House)

    “Let’s bask in this new collection of short stories, which is how many of us first discovered him and where he excels like no other.”
    –San Francisco Chronicle

    Samanta Schweblin, tr. Megan McDowell, Seven Empty Houses: Stories

    Samanta Schweblin, tr. Megan McDowell, Seven Empty Houses
    (Riverhead)

    “Darker and more tinged with terror than her breakthrough novel, Fever Dream, this is Schweblin at her sharpest and most ferocious.”
    –The New York Times Book Review

    Fatimah Asghar, When We Were Sisters

    Fatimah Asghar, When We Were Sisters
    (One World)

    “Asghar brings that same lyricism from her poetry collection … crafting vignettes with dark but tender prose that form a striking picture of the sisters’ daily lives.”
    –Booklist

    Barbara Kingsolver, Demon Copperhead

    Barbara Kingsolver, Demon Copperhead
    (Harper)

    Demon Copperhead is a page-turner, and Kingsolver’s best novel by far. That’s saying something — she’s written many brilliant ones … This novel’s oomph lies in its narration — a taut, witty telling.”
    –Star Tribune

    listening in the dark

    Amber Tamblyn, Listening in the Dark
    (Park Row)

    “From her poetry to her essays, Tamblyn’s luminous writing shines as brightly as her powerful acting … The contributors are unmatched in talent.”
    –Booklist

    Alan Rickman, Madly, Deeply: The Diaries of Alan Rickman

    Alan Rickman, Madly, Deeply: The Diaries of Alan Rickman
    (Henry Holt)

    “He was much-loved, is much-missed, and was an awe-inspiring actor … you have to pan through a lot of words, but there is true gold in there.”
    –iNews

    in the mouth of the wolf

    Katherine Corcoran, In the Mouth of the Wolf
    (Bloomsbury)

    “Corcoran’s vivid account is based on hundreds of interviews she conducted in Mexico over seven years … this succeeds both as an homage to the heroic Martínez and as a gripping real-life whodunit.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    Dani Shapiro, Signal Fires

    Dani Shapiro, Signal Fires
    (Knopf)

    “[Shapiro’s] well-developed characters and their interesting careers seal the deal.”
    –Kirkus

    Nicholas Dawidoff, The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice, and the American City

    Nicholas Dawidoff, The Other Side of Prospect
    (W. W. Norton)

    “A searing portrait of injustice in America.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    Manuel Muñoz, The Consequences

    Manuel Muñoz, The Consequences
    (Graywolf)

    “…luminous … Nuanced, thoughtful, often moving stories.”
    –Kirkus

    Peter Brooks, Seduced by Story: The Use and Abuse of Narrative

    Peter Brooks, Seduced by Story
    (NYRB)

    “A rigorous exploration of narrative, from its usage in classic literature to its misuse in contemporary discourse … An enlightening challenge to readers curious about literary theory and its real-world applications.”
    –Kirkus

    hugs and cuddles

    Joao Gilberto Noll, tr. Edgar Garbelotto, Hugs and Cuddles
    (Two Lines Press)

    “The author creates a dizzying, hallucinatory effect … Noll (1946–2017) transcends erotica for a memorable story of an attempt at liberation.”
    –Publishers Weekly

    the tiger and the cage

    Emma Bolden, The Tiger and the Cage
    (Soft Skull)

    “A well-written, deeply researched, and searingly frank memoir about reproductive health.”
    –Kirkus

  • Become a Lit Hub Supporting Member: Because Books Matter

    For the past decade, Literary Hub has brought you the best of the book world for free—no paywall. But our future relies on you. In return for a donation, you’ll get an ad-free reading experience, exclusive editors’ picks, book giveaways, and our coveted Joan Didion Lit Hub tote bag. Most importantly, you’ll keep independent book coverage alive and thriving on the internet.

    x
    %d bloggers like this: