Lit Hub’s Most Anticipated Books
of 2020, Part 2

A Reading List for Our Cursed Timeline

DECEMBER

Emma Glass, Rest and Be Thankful

Emma Glass, Rest and Be Thankful
Bloomsbury, December 1

This new, short novel by the author of Peach, who George Saunders called “an immensely talented young writer” whose “fearlessness renews one’s faith in the power of literature,” also comes with a blurb from Florence Welch, which certainly piques my interest. In Glass’s trademark, lyrical style, it follows a woman on the edge—a night-shift nurse in a pediatric unit who may or may not be seeing things.  –Emily Temple, Managing Editor

 

Sam J. Miller, The Blade Between

Sam J. Miller, The Blade Between
Ecco, December 1

The latest novel from the author of Blackfish City is a ghost story set in every New Yorker’s newest obsession: the Hudson Valley—which turns out to be overrun than more than just gentrifiers. Can’t say I’m not intrigued. –Emily Temple, Managing Editor

 

Chelsea G. Summers, A Certain Hunger
Chelsea G. Summers, A Certain Hunger
Unnamed Press, December 1

Megan Abbott calls this sinister debut “American Psycho as rewritten by Angela Carter,” which . . . might just be one of the best comps I’ve ever read. Also: food and murder and a female psychopath! These are all things I like and need to have on my bookshelf.  –Emily Temple, Managing Editor

 

Ryan Gattis, The System

Ryan Gattis, The System
MCD, December 8

In Ryan Gattis’ next novel, two men go to prison for a murder, but only one of them is guilty, and both were railroaded by a cop with a grudge. A close friend sets out to find out why, and how, his friends got framed for the job. Gattis is known for his sweeping multi-character crime epics, and The System looks to be his best yet.  –Molly Odintz, CrimeReads Senior Editor

 

Lorraine Hansberry, ed. Mollie Godfrey, Conversations with Lorraine Hansberry

Lorraine Hansberry, ed. Mollie Godfrey, Conversations with Lorraine Hansberry
University of Mississippi Press, December 15

With Looking for Lorraine, Imani Perry renewed interest in the life and work of a well-loved playwright. We have reason to thank Mollie Godfrey, then, for wrangling virtually all of Lorraine Hansberry’s published interviews, including ones she gave on radio and TV. What did she think about protest art? Did she prefer realism or naturalism, the tenets of Black nationalism or those of integration? You’ll learn that here.  –Aaron Robertson, Assistant Editor

 

John Took, Why Dante Matters: An Intelligent Person's Guide

John Took, Why Dante Matters: An Intelligent Person’s Guide
Bloomsbury Continuum, December 15

2021 will be the 700th year since the death of Dante Alighieri, a poet everyone has heard of but few people understand deeply. This book will tell you why you should fix that, and also . . . fix it quite a bit in the process.  –Emily Temple, Managing Editor

Emily Temple
Emily Temple
Emily Temple is the managing editor at Lit Hub. Her first novel, The Lightness, was published by William Morrow/HarperCollins in June 2020. You can buy it here.





More Story
Love Letters, Libertines, and Last Words During the French Revolution We’re living through the most chaotic days of my life, though some of my friends in the arts find this upheaval inspiring. I...