What The Reviewers Say

Rave

Based on 5 reviews

Miss Kopp Just Won’t Quit

Amy Stewart

What The Reviewers Say

Rave

Based on 5 reviews

Miss Kopp Just Won’t Quit

Amy Stewart

Rave
Katherine A. Powers,
The Washington Post
The books are based on actual events with characters and deeds embellished to create marvelous historical novels. The present book finds Constance as both deputy and matron of the female prisoners at the Hackensack county jail in the autumn of 1916. Though she often sleeps at the jail, she still lives on the farm with her sisters.
Rave
Jen Baker,
Booklist
...Stewart again portrays the uncomfortable conditions experienced by women in America in the WWI era, including sketches of women detained on morality charges in the Hackensack jail. The particularly compelling main case here—about a woman committed to an insane asylum by her husband under false pretenses— furthers this theme and forms the heart of the story.
Rave
New York Journal of Books
Constance Kopp fearlessly plows through her day as the first female deputy sheriff in New Jersey, following her instincts toward justice and confident that she’s on the right path. The story opens on her dangerous rescue of a prisoner who has tried to escape and ends up in a fast-flowing stormy river and, in handcuffs, practically drowns. When Constance heroically rescues him in a feat of strength, stamina and 'just won’t give up' swimming, it’s still not enough to win her the accolades she deserves...Instead of awarding her a medal for her bravery, the men in power call her 'demon deputy' and 'troublesome lady policeman' in an effort to sway public opinion by scapegoating an uppity woman as a disgrace to the office of the sheriff. Historically, it’s interesting to observe dirty election strategy at the turn-of-the-century, using the general misogyny that was alive and well at the time.
Positive
Kirkus
Sheriff Heath, Constance Kopp’s liberal-minded mentor and defender at the Hackensack County Jail, is reluctantly running for Congress because he’s term-limited by New Jersey law. Odious John Courter, running to succeed Heath, attacks his record at every opportunity, including most particularly the 'Troublesome Lady Policeman Who Frees Lunatics from Asylum.
Positive
Publishers Weekly
Deputy Constance Kopp, of Bergen County, N.J., comes under scrutiny during the brutal 1916 election season in bestseller Stewart’s fraught fourth Kopp Sisters novel. While her mentor and boss, Sheriff Robert Heath, runs for Congress, the real-life Constance prepares for a successor less supportive of the 'lady deputy.' Her extracurricular investigation into the case of Anna Kayser, a seemingly sane woman whose husband and doctor conspired to send her to a mental institution, unexpectedly threatens to affect the election. Stewart draws on newspaper accounts from the era for the vicious rhetoric aimed at Constance, whose audacity at working in a male-dominated profession provides political fodder for her boss’s opponents.